Consent and Personal Data: Charting the Differences between the PDPA and GDPR

I. IntroductionOver the past few years, techniques to refine and process data have been developed and honed. Whether it is developments in machine learning or the internet-of-things, the invention of these technologies has made data a valuable and strategic commodity.[1] Given the importance and value of data to commercial operations, this has led to the … Continue reading Consent and Personal Data: Charting the Differences between the PDPA and GDPR

Breaking the Cycle of At-Risk Behaviour in Youths: Singapore’s 2020 Family Guidance Order

I. IntroductionIt is no secret that children and youths are often rowdy and mischievous. The real problem arises when mischief turns into criminal activity. Faced with extreme troublemakers who may have stepped foot into illegality, what can parents do? Children and young persons (“CYPs”) who engage in behaviour that puts them at risk of committing … Continue reading Breaking the Cycle of At-Risk Behaviour in Youths: Singapore’s 2020 Family Guidance Order

Benefits of the Personal Data Protection (Amendment) Act 2020 to the Consumer

I. IntroductionThis article explains how the Personal Data Protection (Amendment) Act 2020[1] (the “Amendment”) benefits the user in three areas: customer experience, safeguards, and transparency. Firstly, the Amendment improves customer experience in two ways: (1) deemed consent by contractual necessity eliminates the hassle of clicking multiple checkboxes to express the user’s consent to the sharing … Continue reading Benefits of the Personal Data Protection (Amendment) Act 2020 to the Consumer

Levelling the Playing Field between the Prosecution and the Defence: Steps in the Right Direction

Developed by Herbert Packer, the Crime Control Model and Due Process Model espouse different ideologies in criminal justice – the former prioritises efficient crime suppression in the interests of public order, while the latter emphasises the primacy of individual rights in relation to the state. While Singapore’s criminal justice regime incorporates characteristics of both, historically, experts have argued that it bears greater similarity to the Crime Control Model.

Fair Enough? An Examination of Existing Legal Limits on Prosecutorial Discretion

The story of Ms Parti Liyani is one of a harrowing journey through the criminal justice regime, resulting in eventual victory, but at great cost. In March 2019, Ms Liyani stood trial for four theft-related charges and was found guilty of all four charges. On appeal, it was found that the Prosecution had led Ms Liyani to make an admission at the trial below, by failing to disclose the non-functional state of a DVD player she was accused of stealing. Although she was eventually acquitted, Ms Liyani’s story is a demonstration of the impact of prosecutorial decisions on accused persons.

Gender Roles Have Changed – The Law on Maintenance Should Too

The Women’s Charter marked a significant swing for gender equality in Singapore. Its founders wanted to foster the principle of equality between women and men through its enactment.[1] Under the Charter, both spouses are regarded as equal beings capable of cooperating with each order to promote the interests of the marriage.

Recently, the debate on issues relating to gender equality has received much attention in the public forum. On 20 September 2020, Law and Home Affairs Minister K. Shanmugam has announced that the Singapore government will review crucial issues on gender equality which will culminate in a White Paper by the first half of next year.