Healthcare & AI for a rapidly ageing Singapore

On 6th February 2020, the SMU Centre for AI & Data Governance and SGInnovate hosted a panel discussion on the ‘Challenges of employing AI in the healthcare sector’. The 90-minute panel was chaired by Miss Sunita Kannan - Data, AI Advisory and Responsible AI expert. The other panelists included Professor Dov Greenbaum (Director of the Zvi Meitar Institute for Legal Implications of Emerging Technologies, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya Israel), Dr Tan Jit Seng (Founder and Director of Lotus Eldercare and Vice President of the Asia Pacific Assistive Robotics Association) and Mr. Julien Willeme (Legal Director for Medtronic, Asia-Pacific). Arina Rashid and Jill Phua report on the discussion in this event report.

Fraudulent Sex Criminalisation in Singapore: An Accidental Success

The Criminal Law Reform Act 2019, which introduced new regulation relating to fraudulent sex, came into effect on 1 January 2020. These amendments are meant to ensure that the law keeps pace with recent developments on sexual consent, and provide some clarity in that respect. The question is: are they enough? In a thought-provoking seminar, Associate Professor Chen Jianlin of the Melbourne Law School posits that these amendments in the Penal Code were an accidental success.

Surviving flow-down liability for liquidated damages: a guide for subcontractors

Liquidated damages (“LD”) clauses are a common measure for an employer to mitigate against delays caused by the main contractor. This same clause is often featured in subcontracts – they minimize the main contractor’s exposure to liability for delays caused by the subcontractor, and pass down the liability for LDs to the subcontractor. Unsurprisingly, LD clauses are one of the most common causes of disputes between main contractors and subcontractors as the payable amount can be quite substantial. This commentary will seek to explain the potential liability of a subcontractor for LDs arising from delays, and consider possible defences to be raised.

Doxxing in Singapore: Laws and Remedies

The growing trend of online vigilantism, coupled with the increasing number of doxxing incidents - where others’ personal information is published online - has highlighted the need for legislation against such conduct. In light of this growing issue, Parliament has amended the Protection from Harassment Act (“POHA”) to criminalise doxxing and provide more comprehensive remedies against doxxing. This article will explain when doxxing constitutes an offence under the POHA, as well as the remedies available for victims of doxxing.

Airplane Accidents – Understanding your rights under Article 17(1) and 21(1) of the Montreal Convention

October 29, 2018. Flight 610, Lion Air smashes into the Java Sea off Indonesia, killing all 189 souls aboard. This is swiftly followed by Flight 302, Ethiopian Airlines, which crashes in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. Again, no survivors are left. Preliminary investigations reveal that the auto-pilot systems in both cases forced the plane into a death dive, giving its crew little time to react. Claims for compensation are still pending, with families apparently pressured into signing away their legal rights. This article therefore seeks to inform the public of their rights in such cases. It sets out the legal regime that governs aircraft accidents, and the type of losses compensable, whether in the event of death or a serious injury to a loved one.

PROTECTION FROM THE PEEPING TOM: Interpreting the New Offence of Voyeurism

Under the Criminal Law Reform Act 2019, it is an offence for any person to observe or record someone doing a private act, without that person’s consent. It is also an offence to possess, gain access to, distribute, or threaten to distribute images so recorded.This paper focuses on the core offence of voyeurism, and its interpretation under the new laws.