Demystifying Prosecutorial Discretion – What It Is & How It Is Exercised

Parti Liyani was an Indonesian domestic helper who was charged with stealing up to $34,000 worth of items from then-Changi Airport Group chairman Liew Mun Leong and his family. She was initially sentenced to jail, but on appeal the High Court acquitted Ms Liyani of all charges. The High Court held that the Prosecution had not provided sufficient credible evidence to support its claims. Furthermore, the Prosecution could not rebut the Defence’s allegation that Ms Liyani’s employers had an improper motive in making a police report against Ms Liyani, i.e. to prevent her from lodging a complaint to the authorities about being asked to work outside her approved place of employment.

The precise ambit of the sealing requirement for deeds: Lim Zhipeng v Seow Suat Thin [2020] SGCA 89

Parties (“creditors”) who loan money to others (“debtors”) are often concerned that the debtors will be unable or unwilling to repay them. Such creditors may then enter into deeds of guarantee with third parties (“guarantors”) to secure the repayment of their loans if their debtors default on payment of the same. Unlike a contract, a deed does not require consideration to be legally enforceable.[1] However, for a deed to be legally enforceable, several other formalities must be fulfilled. In particular, the deed must be “signed, sealed, and delivered”.

Handling Roommate Troubles: A Brief Legal Guide

After a long day at work or school, we all want to retreat to a peaceful environment where we can truly relax. But a difficult roommate that you share an apartment with can get in the way of that. A roommate who leaves his dishes undone and rubbish uncleared is trouble enough, but what about one who secretly uses your clothes, takes your shampoo, and steals your things? Read on to find answers to the following questions

Enforcement of Verbal Contracts and Evidential Issues

Suppose Adam agrees verbally to purchase oranges from a supplier, Ben, for Adam’s business. Adam finds out the very next day that another supplier, Cindy, can provide those oranges at a lower cost. Being a shrewd businessman, Adam no longer wishes to purchase them from Ben. He calls up Ben to inform him of the bad news. Ben threatens to sue. Can Ben now enforce that verbal agreement with Adam? And if Ben had secretly recorded down the conversation, can it be used as evidence of the verbal agreement? These questions will all be addressed in this article. For present purposes however, our present analysis with a basic discussion of contracts.

An Employers’ Guide to CPF Contributions

The Central Provident Fund (“CPF”) is sometimes referred to as “Calculate, Pay or get Fined” by Singaporean employers. This is because the Central Provident Fund Act requires them to contribute to their employees’ CPF accounts or get fined for failure to do so.

A Guide to Bankruptcy and Debt Recovery in Singapore

For some, a man is only as good as his word. There is logic in this, given that creditors (also known as moneylenders) often worry about whether borrowers will repay their debts. Debt recovery, after all, can be a tedious and frustrating process. Creditors may often receive no response despite calling, e-mailing, and sending letters to the borrower. Looking for them at their home or workplace may be a similarly futile endeavour. And on the off chance that the borrower can be contacted, a common refrain will be that the borrower has no money now, and will repay you later.